Use Cases

Avoiding Transportation Costs For Disposing Treated “Toxic” Wood – We Go Where The Treated Wood Is!

OUR SOLUTION

treatedwoodmarket

We can bring our combustor to where the treated wood is, eliminate much of the transport costs that would have occurred, and destroy it cleanly and cost-effectively.

We can offer industrial companies, railroads and telecom companies (rail ties and utility poles) a new “clean” and cost-effective alternative, especially when the treated wood is too far from biomass plants and transportation costs, even to landfill, is cost-prohibitive.

Our unit has 3 distinct advantages for disposing of treated wood:

In nearly all cases, it would be a lower cost disposal option compared to landfill; Using pollution scrubbers, toxic treated wood would turn into “clean combustible hot air exhaust.”

Our small-scale unit can go where the treated wood is. It can operate at a high volume consumption of 1500-2000 lbs/hour (equates to over 4300 tons of disposed treated wood a year)

THE PROBLEM WITH TREATED WOOD DISPOSAL

Background: All generators of discarded treated wood, such as railroads and utility companies, must currently dispose of hazardous creosote-based treated wood either in landfills or by incineration in a pre-approved power plant and are required to follow strict, national EPA and individual state guidelines.

Disposal costs and methods used are based on the following factors:

  • How far one has to transport the treated wood
  • The quantity of discarded, treated wood at any one location to transport.
  • The tipping fees charged by the landfill or power plant once the treated wood arrives there

View Our Treated Wood Market Analysis

Interesting Links About The Treated Wood Marketplace

Problem #1: DISPOSING TREATED WOOD AT BIOMASS PLANTS IS LIMITING:
The most common solution is large-quantity combustion by EPA-approved biomass power plants. However, there are only a limited number of biomass plants that can cleanly incinerate treated wood. If the treated wood is not easily transportable by rail or truck to the biomass plant, this option becomes cost-prohibitive. Thus, burning the treated wood at a biomass power plant is not always a cost effective disposal solution for relatively small quantities of treated wood that are remotely located.

Problem #2: A SIGNIFICANT PORTION OF TREATED WOOD END UP IN LANDFILL OR JUST IN LARGE LAND-BASED STOCKPILES:
Due to logistics and prohibitive transport costs, a significant portion of treated wood either winds up in landfills or litters the landscape in large stockpiles throughout the country, with toxins usually over time seeping into the water table.

Depositing the wood in specially-lined landfills takes up precious space and produces toxic waste over many years. For example, a 160 pound railroad tie ultimately decays into over 100 pounds of methane and carbon dioxide.

Potential Use Cases

We wrote brief writeups for each of these use cases to illustrate the different ways our unit can be deployed, especially due to its mobility.

Our strategic plan is to focus on just one or two areas, initially, based on market receptivity, ROI, and overall socio-economic benefits derived from simultaneously destroying waste and producing energy.

In 2016, we wrote up 3 solutions that showcase the larger global impact of our WTE combustor: For refugee camps, for destroying plastic, and as an alternative to landfill, especially in developing countries.